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Analysis on the global opioid crisis

The opioid crisis in the US has escalated in recent years, with over 81,000 drug overdose deaths occurring in 12 months ending May 2020. This is the highest number of overdose deaths ever recorded in a 12-month period.

Concerning patterns are starting to arise across the Atlantic, where opioid prescription rates in the UK have doubled over the last 10 years. As these two countries face parallel issues, we wanted to analyse how people in the US and UK speak about opioids. 

To illustrate how different a global problem has escalated across two territories, we compared Twitter conversations in the two countries, and our analysis is useful for healthcare agencies decide how communicate to each audience, using their own words and concerns.

Fill in your details on the right to access the findings.

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